Yesterday’s History

I’m not saying we landed on the moon

like I’m not saying we didn’t

I’m in no way endorsing nor denying the existence of the Apollo 11 mission

cause I wanna believe it was one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind

but I have had to update my history before

I now know Leif Eriksson beat Columbus to The New World by 500 years

but why should we care about the Europeans when the Asians were already living here

today called First Nations

and if you accept this

how can you have any trust left over for History that happened over forty years ago?

Or even yesterday?

It took us 500 years to discover Eriksson

how long will it take to know what yesterday will say?

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16 thoughts on “Yesterday’s History

  1. Steven Myers

    a professor weighed down by a briefcase
    had his lecture on the bering strait interrupted by a
    a lady with horse mane hair who said,
    “there was no bering strait pilgrimage. my people
    walked out of a log.”

    Reply
      1. Steven Myers

        well i would say that only the people who believe in a specif origin really know and there are 10,000 different origins, 8,000 different arks and floods and sacrifices….as it should be.
        the rest of us probably don’t care. we got bills to pay.

      2. cottonbombs Post author

        Though History was one of my favorite subjects, I understand the people who don’t care, bills to pay or not. It’s hard to accept a subject that is so malleable and subjective. A History book in Japan reads very differently than a History book in Korea. But a Korean high school student could swap Math books with a Japanese student and get the same answers.

      3. Steven Myers

        “it’s all relative man”
        i always loved that as a defense when the prinicpal asks why you flooded her office, but does it really matter if the world exists with 10,000 different histories?
        ants and cicadas and buffaloes and endless spices and all histories fascinating except the ones that rationalize wickedness for wickedness sake.

      4. cottonbombs Post author

        It’s all relative is a way of grounding us to the lightening strikes of time that seem so dramatic at the time but with time we see they were just a flash in the pan. I am a good baseball player compared to the people in my my neighborhood, but, wait till you put me batting in front of Halladay. Suddenly I go from great to pathetic in just one curveball.

  2. granbee

    Outstanding and very important point you make here, dear Peter, about history and what happens when! What if we are living in a time wrinkle and we will find we are less “advanced” than were people who were on this North American continent 3,000-4,000 years ago? Excellent reason to never, ever make assumptions and never, ever consider that one has “all the facts.”

    Reply
  3. Steven Myers

    halladay is a sell out,
    like every one else,
    except what’s his name weaver the angel
    and i love the phillies losing ways
    and love the jays winnning ways.
    but heart out to you brother because i know you
    love both halladay and the phillies.

    Reply
    1. cottonbombs Post author

      I don’t expect everyone to agree with me every time, but, you gotta defend yourself calling out Halladay as a sellout. Halladay’s as pure a player as we’ve ever had in the game.

      Reply
      1. Steven Myers

        i don’t know about pure, but he sure is a master craftsman.
        it strikes me as funny and sad for Halladay how he joiled the philliis
        to get that elusive trophy and that ship is heading in the opposite direction, for now anyway but who knows, maybe the jays will get there faster with yankees getting the blues and orioles….paahf! blue jays versus rays.
        sell out as “compromising in exchange for money or success.”
        maybe i’m just bitter about fielder doing the same.
        players after all are human beings. they switch teams. we shop at different grocery stores. there is no absolute virtue in brand loyalty. it’s a choice and come to think of it,
        how about cj wison being an angel and facing his former team 17 times this season. that adds a lot of spice to an already spicey match up.

      2. cottonbombs Post author

        Halladay was pushed he didn’t jump to the Phillies. And when he did, he chose a team in the National League, that would only compete against the Jays in the World Series. This is a man who gave $3 million of his own money back to the Jays to buy better players. This is the opposite of a sellout.
        There are many intriguing story lines in the game this year. Wilson is definitely one of them.

  4. Steven Myers

    that’s kinda cool. i didn’t know about halladay returning 3 million.
    that’s 2 less mobile homes he could have invested in.
    actually for 3 million, he could buy part of lake ontario.

    Reply
    1. Steven Myers

      i see fielder in detroit and my political job mind says be happy for him,
      but my heart is bitter. i can’t listen to highlights from the last 5 years without being pissed off, so i don’t and i sure as hell ain’t gonna root for the tigers because i’m rooting for the jays.

      Reply
      1. cottonbombs Post author

        I know how player betrayal feels. I used to be a huge Troy Glaus fan, till he was on the steroid list. I never saw Halladay’s departure as betrayal, but, it still hurts not to see him live every 5 games. Well, so I got mlb.com, and suddenly I’m a Phillies fan.

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